Wednesday, September 21, 2016

PITCHSLAM 10. Young Adult Contemporary: FORGOTTEN

Title: Forgotten

Genre: YA Contemporary

Word Count: 80,000

Special Question: Darth Vader. Austen is bossy, always in control, and will stop at nothing to win. But there’s also a soft side in there somewhere, miles beneath that hard shell. And she’s hiding some significant family secrets (maybe nothing as shocking as hidden Jedi twins, but secrets nonetheless).

35 Word Pitch: 

When seventeen-year-old mock trial champion Austen is arrested for murdering her Alzheimer’s-stricken mother, who begged for assisted suicide, Austen must convince a jury her actions were warranted, or she’ll go to prison instead of college.

First 250 Words: 

“Objection,” I shouted. A low wave of groans rippled through the courtroom in response. It was the last round of the California High School Mock Trial Regional Competition, and it had been a long day, especially after the courthouse’s air conditioner switched off an hour too early. Attorney objections stopped the clock, and I’d made a ton of them this round already. Not on purpose, not to show off, but because opposing counsel, a junior from Contra Costa Catholic with one too many shirt buttons unbuttoned, was just so… objectionable. She wasn’t prepared, barely seemed to understand the case problem, and kept saying things that would have gotten her disbarred if she was a real lawyer. And she wouldn’t stop twirling her hair. If she’d tried out for my team, I would have cut her during our first practice.

The local lawyer acting as the presiding judge closed his eyes. He looked exhausted, probably from the increasing temperature in the courtroom and also having to sit through four rounds of competition. He sighed. “State your objection, Ms. McGregor.”

“Hearsay, your honor,” I said. “This witness can’t testify to what the victim’s sister said. It’s an out-of-court statement being offered–”

“Response?” the judge interrupted. I glared at him.

Opposing counsel looked at her five-inch heels. “I don’t know. Whatever. Withdrawn.”

“Fine.” The judge sighed again. “Sustained. Counsel, please continue.”

But she asked the same question a few minutes later and I objected again. The judge’s face reddened. “Girls…er…counsel, can you both approach the bar, please?”

14 comments:

  1. The Force is strong with this one. Intriguing! I cannot wait to read.

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  2. Disciplined, you are. Please send the first 100 pages with a one-page synopsis, to query[at]dunhamlit[dot]com, with "Pitch Slam for Bridget Smith" in the subject line and your query in the body of the message.

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  3. The force is strong with this one! I would love to take a look. Please send to andrea [at] harveyklinger.com.

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  4. I'd like to see the query and full manuscript.

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  5. These are the pages I'm looking for

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  6. I was once a mock trial-er and I'd love to see more. Somebody has to save our skins! Please send the query and the first 100 pages to laura [at] redsofaliterary [dot] com!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Force is strong with this one.

    ReplyDelete
  8. These are the pages I'm looking for: Please forward your query and first 15 pages to vselvaggio@windstream.net Put "Pitch Slam" in the subject line.

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  9. You have the reflexes of a Jedi! (mallory[at]triadaus.com)

    ReplyDelete
  10. The Force is strong with this one.

    ReplyDelete